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Tag Archives: Petr Vronsky

Ghosts of Reason on new CD

Andrew Schultz’s Ghosts of Reason – Symphony No 2, op 76 (2008) has just been pre-released on a compact disc and in digital on-line format. The Naxos-distributed Navona CD is called Reason and Reverence  and is performed by the Czech orchestra, the Moravian Philharmonic, conducted by Petr Vronsky.  More details of the recording at this link.
Links for purchase or listening online:

A recent review of Ghosts of Reason from Denmark:

“The symphony starts with the delicate sounds of a harp like the gentle swaying of grass in the breeze. The breeze intensifies and so do the tones of the harp to a degree that is almost surprising. The brass instruments have joined in although only the harp seems to be noticed. More and more instruments join in and divinely beautiful harmonies fill the room. There is somehow something unknown about it. The violins are not playing the melody. It is the usually accompanying instruments changing roles and taking over the lead. The tempo increases, but suddenly a strange kind of calm descends over the audience. How can it be that the violins continue playing? And yet, all light tones seem to have suddenly disappeared. The double bass has taken control of the orchestra! “I would like to be able to convey the scorched, rich ochre sonority found in the voices of Aborigines”, says Andrew Schultz about his work. He has definitely succeeded in doing so. We, the audience, are spell-bound by this music that takes us on a tour through the desert with whispering wind, through rich and fertile areas with birds flapping their wings, to the coast and the roar of the ocean.

Andrew Schultz’ music is filled with emotions and unexpected sounds. The overwhelming warmth of the music becomes even more striking when you have experienced the intellectual character of the composer. These are sounds that open up for his true self, showing his inner self, so warm and sympathetic. Andrew Schultz’ music touches the soul and speaks to the mind.” [Michael Schäfer, Klassisk Pt 66]


 Naxos information page to purchase the CD

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REASON & REVERENCE


PRE-ORDER + ADD TO WISH LIST + $13.49 ($14.99)

Shipping time: Will not ship until 6/8/2018


Reason and Reverance represents an aural exploration of our world’s complexities. By comparing and contrasting present triumphs with past regrets, the composers on this album develop a compelling, philosophical reflection of the world we live in. Conducted by Petr Vronský, the Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra delivers a master class in cohesiveness while tackling a wildly diverse, yet wholly complete set of compositions. The album starts strong with Christopher Keyes’ An Inescapable Entanglement. Keyes binds minimalist elements with late 16th and early 17th century forms of concerto to create a controlled chaos of instruments and voices playing distinct parts simultaneously. In his intent to create an antiphonal sound, Keyes employs eight loudspeakers to project the music achieving a thickened, full texture. Red Rock is a symphonic poem commissioned by the Henderson Symphony and its music director, Taras Krysa. The music is based on the interaction of two musical materials, the first, calm and diatonic, presented by the French horns after the introduction and elaborated by the trumpets and the woodwinds; and the second, more angular and chromatic, also introduced by a solo French horn in the second section. Similar to a sonata form, these materials go through transformations and developments in the middle section, and return evolved and reconciled at the end of the movement. The piece suggests a gliding trip over the stunning landscape of the Red Rock canyon, with its sharp geological contrasts, its ever changing shapes, and its surprising colors. Fernidnando De Sena’s Deciphered Reverence explores the idea of divine presence and creates an interpretation through the consistent, triumphant swelling of the orchestra. De Sena’s piece captures the many moods, modes, and colors in the music to translate his vision of life and celebrate its ambiguity and omnipresence. Composed by Willem Van Twillert, multiple styles set the foundation for Branches of Singularity. Multiple developments transitions from one style to another create an enticing and evolving piece. Andrew Schultz’ Symphony No. 2 – Ghosts of Reason ties the whole album together. Slowing the pace of the otherwise energetic album, Schultz’s composition paints a haunting atmosphere by drawing out the wistful bleakness of its wandering melodies.

 

FACTS
Item number NV6166
Barcode 896931004664
Release date 6/8/2018
Category Orchestral
Label NAVONA
Media type COMPACT DISC
Number of units 1
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Falling Man/Dancing Man, CD Release

 

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Andrew Schultz’s large-scale 2005 composition for organ and orchestra, Falling Man/Dancing Man, will shortly be released on the US label, Navona, as part of a compilation of contemporary orchestral works. The soloist in the work is the exciting Czech organist, Karel Martinek, performing on the grand organ of the Dum Kultury (House of Culture) in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Full details of the CD are below; individual works on the CD are also available via all digital formats.

 

Falling Man/Dancing Man for solo organ and orchestra,

opus 68 (2005)

Movement 1  Infinity Jinx                          6:00

Movement 2  Deep Crossing                     7:33

Movement 3 The Laughing Man               8:52

Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Petr Vronsky – conductor, Karel Martinek – organ

Recorded at Dum Kultury, Ostrava, Czech Republic on 13 September 2016

Producer: Vit Muzik,  Engineers – Ales Dvorak, Jan Kosulic

CD Title: Winter’s Warmth, Contemporary Works for Orchestra

Label: Navona Records, Catalog: NV6091

Release date: 14 April 2017

Web: www.navonarecords.com/catalog/nv6091

YouTube Promotional Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBOrCkCoPS8

SoundCloud Link: https://soundcloud.com/parmarecordings/winters-warmth

Information about Andrew Schultz: www.andrewschultz.net

An interview with the composer about Falling Man/Dancing Man in StressPoints (eNewsletter of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies): http://www.andrewschultz.net/resources/trauma_classics.pdf

 

 

Program note:

Falling Man/Dancing Man is a concerto-style work for solo pipe organ and orchestra composed for first performance on the organ of the Melbourne Town Hall in 2005. The twenty minute work is in three separate but related movements.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was initially inspired by two photos with contrasting depictions of human reactions to war. The first was the abject image of a Falling Man taken from the ground below the World Trade Centre attacks in New York in 2001. The image was later suppressed and remains a deeply contradictory photo given the choices and pain implicit in the subject’s decision to jump. The second shows a Dancing Man who is celebrating in a Sydney street at the end of World War Two. His hat is in the air as he dances for joy at the end of war. The more I looked into it the more I became aware that images and artwork depicting falling and dancing bodies are almost universal icons from rock art to the present. Perhaps this is because they depict fundamental truths about human experience. Whilst echoes of both these and other images have found their way into the piece, the musical matters took their own course in the work and in the end the organist’s dancing feet and physical elevation in the organ loft also seemed apt for the title.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was commissioned by Symphony Australia for the Melbourne Symphony (with organ soloist, Calvin Bowman and conductor, Oleg Caetani) and composed with the assistance of a residency at the Leighton Studios, Banff Centre for the Arts, Canada.

 

 

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016