Andrew Schultz music news

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Tag Archives: Endling

Endling with Sydney Symphony Orchestra

 

The Sydney Symphony Orchestra/Toby Thatcher present Andrew Schultz’s orchestral work Endling (2007) on their forthcoming tour of regional New South Wales. The programs also include works by Mozart, Schubert and Prokofiev.

The concerts are at:

Newcastle – Civic Theatre, Tuesday 24 May 2016, 7:30pm (more details and tickets)

Taree – Manning Entertainment Centre, Wednesday 25 May 2016, 7:30pm (more details and tickets)

Port Macquarie – Glasshouse, Friday 27 May 2016, 6:30pm (more details and tickets)

 

Civic Theatre promotional material:

“Hear the musicians of the SSO with dynamic young conductor Toby Thatcher in a program that begins at the heart of the orchestral repertoire with Mozart and ends with a cheeky nod to the Classical age by Prokofiev. In between are the vibrant and graceful melodies of Schubert’s Fifth Symphony and beautifully serene music by Andrew Schultz – soaring and noble sounds inspired by the transience of the natural world. The soloist for the night is SSO principal Ben Jacks, playing the most popular of the Mozart horn concertos in what promises to be an exhilarating performance.”

MOZART: Horn Concerto No. 4 in E flat, K495
SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 5
SCHULTZ: Endling
PROKOFIEV: Classical Symphony

 

Composer’s note about Endling:

Nature has defined the “endling” as the “last surviving individual of a species or plant.” This piece flows from a feeling of immense regret and sorrow about all that has been lost from the face of the earth.

Read more about the piece: www.andrewschultz.net/programs/endling.html

Read reviews of Endling from other performances: Endling reviews

 

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November matters

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Upcoming November performances and CD/DVD releases of works by Andrew Schultz.

After Nina is presented by the Glasshouse Trio in Eudlo Hall, Eudlo, Queensland on Saturday 7 November at 7pm. The program also includes works by Brahms, Beethoven and Frankel. Glasshouse Trio (Louise King – cello, Paul Dean – clarinet  and Stephen Emmerson – piano) contains two of the players who commissioned After Nina in 2007 – it has since had many performances by other groups as well. More information and tickets to the concert.

Prelude and Postcript for piano has its European premiere given by Antony Gray in London on Friday 13 November at 8pm at Schott’s Music Shop, 48 Gt Marlborough Street, London W1 in a concert presented by the Grieg Society of Great Britain. More information and tickets to the concert.

Lake Moonrise for mezzo, clarinet, cello and vibes is released on Sunday 15 November on a Tall Poppies CD as a part of the Halcyon collection of works, Kingfisher (Songs for Halcyon). For more details.

Endling is presented on radio and on-line by BBC3 in a performance by the BBC Ulster Orchestra/David Porcelijn – listen live on Tuesday 17 November at 2pm (UK time) or listen on-line afterwards for 10 days – here is the link for more information.

August Offensive for orchestra is presented as a part of the Australian premiere of the Gallipoli Symphony by the Queensland Symphony Orchestra/Jessica Cottis at the Concert Hall, Queensland Performing Arts Centre on Tuesday 24 November 2015 at 7:30pmMore information and tickets to the concert. See a YouTube clip about the Gallipoli Symphony. Listen to the concert live on ABC Classic FM.

ABC Classics have just released the DVD of the August 2015 Istanbul performance of the Gallipoli Symphony (including August Offensive) given by the Istanbul State Symphony/Jessica Cottis. Catalog number is 076 2924. Here are the details

 

Kingfisher_Cover

 

 

More info on the works: www.andrewschultz.net

Endling and Willow Bend with BBC Ulster Orchestra

The BBC Ulster Orchestra, conducted by David Porcelijn, present Willow Bend and Endling by Andrew Schultz in concerts in Ulster Hall, Belfast on  Wednesday 12 August and Friday 14 August. The concerts are a part of the BBC Radio 3 Summer Invitation Concerts with the theme of ‘Music of the Southern Hemisphere.’ The concerts also include music by Grainger, Sculthorpe, Glanville-Hicks and Kats-Chernin.  Other concerts in the series include music from New Zealand and Brazil. For all details of the concerts, broadcasts and the venue please follow this link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/showsandtours/shows/r3_summer_invitation_2015

Excerpts of Endling and Willow Bend can be heard on this BBC website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/4782cba7-8703-4258-881f-0a56dd6a2333

For information about Endling and Willow Bend:

http://www.andrewschultz.net

Watch a YouTube excerpt of Endling as used in the film, Flight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oHTeJBVNQ0

Two recent reviews: ‘eloquent, spare writing’

“Having been very impressed a few years ago by Andrew Schultz’s cantata, Journey to Horseshoe Bend, I approached this collection of his orchestral works with great anticipation. I was not disappointed. He is, in my opinion, one of the finest composers in this country today.”
Read in full the recent Fine Music review of Schultz – Orchestral Works, ABC Classics CD (TSO/Mills/Pike)
“Schultz’s eloquent, spare writing.”
Read in full the Sydney Morning Herald review of After Nina  as played by Selby and Friends in their recent concert series.

“This is music for eternity” – a recent review from Germany of Schultz CD.

Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, Richard Mills: Andrew Schultz – Orchestral Works  (by Burkhard Schäfer, blog.codaex.de)

Paradoxically, the CD begins with an end… “Endling” is the title of the first –and the best – work, and, according to the composer’s words, thematizes the loss of nature and the diversity of species on our planet and the disappearance of beauty in a completely exploited and spiritually vacuous world. This pain is, however, not articulated via atonality and harsh dissonances, rather with an almost transcendental harmony in which the melancholy regarding all that is irretrievable assumes the form of a beauty that takes leave of this world and yet remains facing toward it. Precisely in its serenity and inner calm, this music has something both heartbreaking and deeply moving.

“Endling” recalls a scene from the science fiction film “Soylent Green”, as the old Sol Roth, who no longer sees any point in life, enters a clinic to be administered with a lethal injection. Whilst waiting for the poison to take effect, Sol watches a nature film in which the earth is shown before its total exploitation and destruction, replete with forests, flowers, animals and birds. Accompanying the film is Grieg’s “Morgenstimmung” (Morning Ambience) from the Peer Gynt Suite Nr. 1. Even if “Ending” sounds nothing like Morgenstimmung”, Schultz achieves a similar effect that is difficult to elude. Those who appreciate the emphatic music of the Latvian Peteris Vasks will also love “Endling” although the tone language is different. Small quotes from Vasks can, however be heard, particularly at the end of the piece.

If the association with film music is hinted at in “Endling”, in the two-part violin concerto it is tangible. In Schultz’ case, this does not mean that his compositions can only be associated with (real) films in order to be apprehended: the works themselves are musical films that do not require illustration but are instead, in terms of their sound qualities, both figurative and sensual. In this sense they touch upon the music of the great Latvian (Vasks), whose work similarly engages the large and existential themes of love, nature, belief, longing, hope, life and death with emotion, spontaneity, directness, without fear of drawing upon ‘already used’ tonality and harmony. One can place Schultz’ violin concerto, that had to wait fifteen years to be transferred to CD, in a line of very great works that have been written for this instrument in recent years: “Distant Light” by Peteris Vasks, “Concentric Path” by Thomas Adès or “1001 Nights in the Harem” by Fazil Say.

Schultz’ violin concerto begins with a lengthy movement titled “Chorale Expansive”. Like languorous waves, the music surges forth, retreats, and surges forth again, continuing in this fashion. This is music for eternity. The composer links the concerto with a poem by the English romantic William Butler Yeats that also recalls Goethe’s phrasing in Faust: “formation, transformation,
the eternal mind’s eternal recreation”. The second movement “Dances: Fast and Vibrant” is rhythmic, exuberant and rollicking and provides, as it were, the antithesis to the foregone “Chorale”. At its end, the music returns once more to the quiet waterways of the first movement. As the soloist, the young violinist Jennifer Pike is quite reserved, but her playing is never bland or without contours. With her sensitive approach to the violin concerto, she hits exactly the right tone that one, at most, would in a few places wish to be more voluminous and opulent.

English Translation by Anna Scheer

 Read more: http://blog.codaex.de/2012/05/tasmanian-symphony-orchestra-richard-mills-andrew-schultz-orchestral-works/#more-10383