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Falling Man/Dancing Man, CD Release

 

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Andrew Schultz’s large-scale 2005 composition for organ and orchestra, Falling Man/Dancing Man, will shortly be released on the US label, Navona, as part of a compilation of contemporary orchestral works. The soloist in the work is the exciting Czech organist, Karel Martinek, performing on the grand organ of the Dum Kultury (House of Culture) in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Full details of the CD are below; individual works on the CD are also available via all digital formats.

 

Falling Man/Dancing Man for solo organ and orchestra,

opus 68 (2005)

Movement 1  Infinity Jinx                          6:00

Movement 2  Deep Crossing                     7:33

Movement 3 The Laughing Man               8:52

Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Petr Vronsky – conductor, Karel Martinek – organ

Recorded at Dum Kultury, Ostrava, Czech Republic on 13 September 2016

Producer: Vit Muzik,  Engineers – Ales Dvorak, Jan Kosulic

CD Title: Winter’s Warmth, Contemporary Works for Orchestra

Label: Navona Records, Catalog: NV6091

Release date: 14 April 2017

Web: www.navonarecords.com/catalog/nv6091

YouTube Promotional Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBOrCkCoPS8

SoundCloud Link: https://soundcloud.com/parmarecordings/winters-warmth

Information about Andrew Schultz: www.andrewschultz.net

An interview with the composer about Falling Man/Dancing Man in StressPoints (eNewsletter of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies): http://www.andrewschultz.net/resources/trauma_classics.pdf

 

 

Program note:

Falling Man/Dancing Man is a concerto-style work for solo pipe organ and orchestra composed for first performance on the organ of the Melbourne Town Hall in 2005. The twenty minute work is in three separate but related movements.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was initially inspired by two photos with contrasting depictions of human reactions to war. The first was the abject image of a Falling Man taken from the ground below the World Trade Centre attacks in New York in 2001. The image was later suppressed and remains a deeply contradictory photo given the choices and pain implicit in the subject’s decision to jump. The second shows a Dancing Man who is celebrating in a Sydney street at the end of World War Two. His hat is in the air as he dances for joy at the end of war. The more I looked into it the more I became aware that images and artwork depicting falling and dancing bodies are almost universal icons from rock art to the present. Perhaps this is because they depict fundamental truths about human experience. Whilst echoes of both these and other images have found their way into the piece, the musical matters took their own course in the work and in the end the organist’s dancing feet and physical elevation in the organ loft also seemed apt for the title.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was commissioned by Symphony Australia for the Melbourne Symphony (with organ soloist, Calvin Bowman and conductor, Oleg Caetani) and composed with the assistance of a residency at the Leighton Studios, Banff Centre for the Arts, Canada.

 

 

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016

 

Schultz premiere performances

 

SSO/Thatcher perform Endling in Newcastle 2016.

SSO/Thatcher perform Schultz’s Endling in Newcastle 2016.

 

 

Premiere performances, 2014-17

WP – World Premiere; AP – Australian Premiere; ASP – Asian Premiere; EP – European Premiere

 

New work – Cantata (libretto, Katherine Firth). St John’s Camerata and Choir, St John’s Southbank, Melbourne, 3 December 2017. WP.

Maali – Concerto for oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon. West Australian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Simone Young; soloists: Peter Facer (oboe), Allan Meyer (clarinet), Jane Kirchner-Lindner (bassoon), David Evans (horn), Perth Concert Hall, 4 & 5 August 2017. WP.

Sleepers Wake – Karalananga. Bernard Lanskey, World Classical Music Series, Royal Mirage Hotel, Dubai, 16 December 2016. ASP.

Night Flight. Sophie Rowell and Kristian Chong, Melbourne Recital Centre, 2 May 2016. AP.

Nocturnes and Variations. Stephen Emmerson, Conservatory Concert Hall, National University of Singapore, 17 February 2016. ASP.

Gallipoli Symphony (includes August Offensive, large orchestra version). Queensland Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jessica Cottis, Concert Hall, Qld Performing Arts Centre, Brisbane, 24 November 2015. AP

Prelude and Postscript. Antony Gray, Grieg Society of Great Britain – Schott’s Music Shop, London, 13 November 2015. EP.

Nocturnes and Variations. Stephen Emmerson, Ian Hanger Recital Hall, Queensland Conservatorium, Brisbane, 28 October 2015. WP.

Paradise and Prelude and Postscript. Halcyon, Io Myers Theatre, UNSW, Sydney, 17 September 2015. AP.

Endling and Willow Bend. BBC Ulster Orchestra conducted by David Porcelijn, Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 12-14 August 2015. EP.

Gallipoli Symphony (includes August Offensive, large orchestra version). Istanbul State Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jessica Cottis, Hagia Irene Monumental Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, 4 August 2015. WP.

Le Molière Imaginaire. I Fagiolini, Sydney Recital Hall (also Newcastle, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra, Perth), Musica Viva International Concert Series, 25 July – 8 August 2015. WP.

Sound Lur and Serpent. Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vasily Petrenko, Concert Hall, Sydney Opera House, 22-24 July 2015. AP.

Paradise. Felicitas Fuchs, Li-Wei Qin, Bernard Lanskey, La Longtaine, Montigny sur Loing, France, 8 June 2015. WP.

August Offensive. Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Garry Walker, Federation Concert Hall, Hobart, 27 March 2015. AP.

St Peter’s Suite. St Peter’s Symphonic Winds conducted by Andrew Schultz, St John’s Cathedral, Brisbane, 2 August 2014. WP.

Sound Lur and Serpent. Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Robertson, Shanghai Oriental Arts Centre, China (also Jinan, Beijing, Xi’an, Hangzhou, Shenzhen, Guangzhou), 24 June–5 July 2014. WP.

 

For more information on these performances, the website andrewschultz.net, has been updated and includes recent catalogue additions, press reviews and recording releases.

Six compositions shortlisted for major Australian awards

Reprinted from Limelight Magazine, November 14, 2016
James Ledger, Milliken, Skipworth, Dean, Ford and Schultz are in the running for Paul Lowin Prizes.

It’s been three years since the prestigious Paul Lowin Prizes were last awarded, but today six recent Australian compositions have been announced as finalists for awards in 2016. The Orchestral Prize, worth $25,000, and the Song Cycle Prize, worth $15,000, are among Australia’s richest rewards for music composition and are managed every two or three years by Perpetual in collaboration with the Australian Music Centre.

The three works shortlisted for this year’s Orchestral Prize are James Ledger’s 2013 Violin Concert Golden Years, written for Margaret Blades and commissioned by the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, Cathy Milliken’s Earth Plays, premiered last year by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and winner of this year’s Art Music Awards Orchestral Work of the Year, and Lachlan Skipworth’s Clarinet Concerto, which won the Australian Art Music Awards’ 2015 prize for Best Performance of an Australian Composition for Ashley Smith and WASO.

Shortlisted for the Song Cycle Prize are Brett Dean’s Hamlet-inspired String Quartet No 2 for soprano and string quartet And once I played Ophelia (now recorded on the Chandos label), Andrew Ford’s 2013 song cycle Last Words for soprano, violin, cello and piano – a setting of final remarks from Goethe and Alban Berg to Cloudstreet’s Fish Lamb – and Andrew Schultz’s Paradise, a setting of five songs for soprano, cello and piano written in 2013.

Paul Lowin, who died in Vienna in 1961, was born in 1893 in Czechoslovakia, lived in Austria in the 1930s, and fled the Nazi terror to come to Australia in 1939. In his hand-written will he stated his wish to establish a competition for works by living Australian composers, but left rather subjective instructions that the entries would be expected to be in a “modern but not too modern” style. It took executors an agonising 30 years to thrash out what that awkward qualification actually meant and how it might be applied in practice, before the first awards took place in 1991.

According to the judges, a record number of entries were received this time around, with 67 orchestral submissions and 59 song cycles. As has always been the case, nominations were accepted from the general public as well as from a range of music professionals. Previous Paul Lowin Prize winners have included Nigel Westlake, Elliott Gyger, Mary Finsterer, Andrew Schultz, Brett Dean, Rosalind Page, Nigel Butterley, Julian Yu, Georges Lentz, Brenton Broadstock, Martin Wesley-Smith, Michael Smetanin, Raffæle Marcellino, Liza Lim and Andrew Ford.

The recipients of the two Paul Lowin Prizes will be announced at a ceremony in Sydney on December 6. Other shortlisted works will receive a special commendation and the sum of $400.

– See more at: http://www.limelightmagazine.com.au/news/six-compositions-shortlisted-major-australian-music-awards#sthash.vio7xMX1.dpuf

Le Molière Imaginaire wins Art Music Award

Comedic send-up wins Art Music Award

Republished from UNSW Newsroom, 17 August 2016.  Article by Clare Morgan.

 

A “witty and naughty” vocal send-up by composer and Head of the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW,  Andrew Schultz has won a 2016 Art Music Award.

17_andrew_schultz.jpg

Composer and Professor of Music Andrew Schultz.

A hilarious vocal send-up of the medical profession has won Head of the School of the Arts & Media Professor Andrew Schultz a 2016 Art Music Award.

Professor Schultz won the Vocal/Choral Work of the Year for his comical Le Molière Imaginaire, composed for the eight voices of British a cappella ensemble I Fagiolini.

Described as “urbane, virtuosic, cultured, witty and naughty in equal measure”, Le Molière Imaginaire was inspired by the final scene in Molière’s last play, Le Malade Imaginaire (The Imaginary Invalid). It features a musical interlude in which a mock graduation ceremony for a quack doctor becomes increasingly farcical.

Professor Schultz shared the award with writer Timothy Knapman, who adapted the original text.

The comic romp had its world premiere as part of Musica Viva Australia’s 2015 international concert season.

Professor Schultz had a second work nominated in the same category, Paradise, five songs for soprano, cello and piano.

The Art Music Awards, presented by the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) and the Australian Music Centre, are Australia’s night of nights for musicians based in the experimental, jazz and classical genres.

This year’s awards ceremony was held in Melbourne and hosted by Jonathan Biggins.

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Watch a video interview with Andrew Schultz about the award

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Read more about the awards in Limelight Magazine

Endling and Willow Bend with BBC Ulster Orchestra

The BBC Ulster Orchestra, conducted by David Porcelijn, present Willow Bend and Endling by Andrew Schultz in concerts in Ulster Hall, Belfast on  Wednesday 12 August and Friday 14 August. The concerts are a part of the BBC Radio 3 Summer Invitation Concerts with the theme of ‘Music of the Southern Hemisphere.’ The concerts also include music by Grainger, Sculthorpe, Glanville-Hicks and Kats-Chernin.  Other concerts in the series include music from New Zealand and Brazil. For all details of the concerts, broadcasts and the venue please follow this link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/showsandtours/shows/r3_summer_invitation_2015

Excerpts of Endling and Willow Bend can be heard on this BBC website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/4782cba7-8703-4258-881f-0a56dd6a2333

For information about Endling and Willow Bend:

http://www.andrewschultz.net

Watch a YouTube excerpt of Endling as used in the film, Flight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oHTeJBVNQ0

Schultz’s August Offensive in Istanbul and Brisbane

Gallipoli Symphony premiere

Commissioned by the Australian Department of Veterans’ Affairs and supported by the Turkish Ministry for Culture and Tourism as part of the 2015 Year of Friendship and during the 100th anniversary year of the Gallipoli Campaign, the World Premiere of Gallipoli Symphony was conducted at the historically-significant Hagia Irene Monumental Museum in Istanbul on Tuesday 4 August 2015. The work contains music by Australian, Turkish and New Zealand composers including Andrew Schultz’s orchestral work, August Offensive.

It was performed to an invitation-only audience by the Istanbul State Symphony Orchestra under the direction of United Kingdom-based Australian conductor, Jessica Cottis.  Specialist soloist musicians Michael Askill (percussion), William Barton (didgeridoo), Horomona Horo (Maori instruments), Julian Jackson (harmonica) and Omar Faruk Tekbilek (Turkish instruments) featured throughout the performance.  A combined choir including representatives from the St Joseph’s Gregory Terrace – All Hallow’s Gallipoli Choir (Australia) and the (Turkish) State Opera and Ballet provided vocal accompaniment in the first and final movements of the Symphony.

Gallipoli Symphony was also performed by the Queensland Symphony Orchestra/Cottis in Brisbane, at the Queensland Performing Arts Centre – Concert Hall, on Tuesday 24 November 2015 at 7:30pm. Details: http://qso.com.au/special-events/gallipoli-symphony

The ABC-TV  broadcast of the Istanbul performance was available on i-view until 20 August 2015: http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/gallipoli-symphony/FA1425H001S00

The ABC-TV production of the Istanbul performance is available on DVD: https://shop.abc.net.au/products/gallipoli-symphony-dvd

The ABC Classics recording of the Brisbane performance is available on CD: https://shop.abc.net.au/products/qld-symphony-gallipoli-symphony-cd and via iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/gallipoli-symphony-viii.-august/id1096207171?i=1096207959

 

Useful links

Visit the Gallipoli Symphony website for full details of the events and music.

Read more about August Offensive and its premiere at Gallipoli in 2013: http://wp.me/p28SRX-5E

Hear an excerpt of August Offensive and read a brief interview about the piece and the Gallipoli Symphony project: http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/social-affairs/musical-tributes-anzac-centenary

Get a recording of August Offensive from iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/schultz-august-offensive-for/id836022448

Read Gordon Williams program note for August Offensive.

Schultz’s Sound Lur and Serpent at Sydney Opera House

Sound Lur and Serpent is a work for brass and percussion composed by Andrew Schultz in 2014 for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s tour of China in late June and early July 2014. The orchestra, conducted by Chief Conductor, David Robertson, presented performances in Shanghai, Jinan, Beijing, Xi’an, Hangzhou, Shenzhen, and Guangzhou with the new work by Schultz opening the concerts.

On 22, 23 and 24 July 2015, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra again present the work – this time under Vasily Petrenko, at the Sydney Opera House Concert Hall, in a program with Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov. Click here for details of the concert, tickets and to read more about Sound Lur and Serpent.

ABC Classic FM will broadcast the concert on Saturday 25 July at 1pm (EAT). Click here for broadcast details or to listen online.

Read a lot more about the work and watch a performance from Beijing’s National Centre for Performing Arts by the SSO/Robertson by following this link to an earlier blog: http://wp.me/p28SRX-8A

August Offensive with the TSO

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra (TSO), conducted by Garry Walker, present the Australian premiere of Andrew Schultz’s August Offensive on Friday 27 March at 7:30pm in the Federation Concert Hall, Hobart, in their Master Series concert.

 

Program

Schultz- August Offensive

Elgar- Cello Concerto (Nicolas Alstaedt, cello soloist)

Interval

Kelly- Elegy

Elgar- Enigma Variations

Read more about August Offensive and its premiere at Gallipoli in 2013: http://wp.me/p28SRX-5E

More details from the TSO about the program and the works: http://www.tso.com.au/concerts/essentially-elgar

ABC Classic Fm broadcast this concert at 1:00pm on ANZAC Day, April 25, 2015: http://www.abc.net.au/classic/music-listings/?date=2015-04-25

Hear an excerpt of the music and read a brief interview about the piece and the Gallipoli Symphony project: http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/social-affairs/musical-tributes-anzac-centenary

Read Gordon Williams program note for August Offensive.

‘Captivating’ and ‘eloquent’ After Nina by Andrew Schultz – recording release

After Nina CD cover copy + logo

 

A recording of Andrew Schultz’s “captivating” and “eloquent” chamber work, After Nina, Opus 73 (2007), will be given a digital release on 20 October 2014 on the Sedition label (SEDITION7). The recording is by three outstanding Australian chamber musicians: Paul Dean – clarinet, Patrick Murphy – cello, and Stephen Emmerson – piano.

After Nina, Opus 73 (2007), by Andrew Schultz was commissioned by the Endeavour Trio (Paul Dean and Stephen Emmerson with cellist Trish O’Brien). The title and the mood of the ten minute piece refer to the Nina Simone version of the song, Strange Fruit with its sparse piano accompaniment. Click here to view the release on i-Tunes.

After Nina work was recorded in Brisbane, Australia in February 2014 along with a number of other chamber and vocal works by Andrew Schultz that will be released as a full CD in 2015 by the Southern Cross Soloists ensemble on the Wirripang label (Wirr 065). Other works on the forthcoming disc include To the evening star for soprano and piano – a work which won the Paul Lowin Prize in 2009. Also to be included will be a work commissioned by the Southern Cross Soloists in 2006, Lines drawn from silence.

Paul Dean is currently the Artistic Director of the Australian National Academy of Music in Melbourne and a member of Southern Cross Soloists. He is regarded as one of the finest clarinettists and chamber musicians in Australia and has recorded for several CD labels. As soloist, recitalist and chamber musician, Paul Dean has performed in Norway, England, Japan, China, the USA and Canada. His recording of brother Brett Dean’s clarinet concerto Ariel’s Music won an ARIA in 1999 and the piece was the Selected Work at the 1999 Paris Rostrum of Composers. In 2004 Paul recorded a CD of music by Andrew Schultz for the Tall Poppies label and in 2009 received rave reviews throughout Europe and the US for his recordings of the Mozart clarinet works on the Melba label. He has performed the premieres of over fifty works, many of which have either been written for or dedicated to him, including Colin Brumby’s and James Penberthy’s Clarinet Concertos and Wilfred Lehmann’s Theme and Variations.

Patrick Murphy is Cello Performance Fellow at the University of Queensland School of Music and a member of Southern Cross Soloists. Prior to that he was Lecturer in Cello at the University of Tasmania, Hobart Conservatorium. He has also taught cello and chamber music at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and worked regularly with the Sydney Symphony. Patrick started learning the cello with Rosemary Iversen in Perth. He completed his Bachelor degree studying with Gregory Baron and Michael Goldschlager before spending several years with the Halcyon String Quartet. Their studies took them to the UK and Canada where they were resident artists at the Banff Centre for the Arts. Patrick then completed a Masters Degree studying with Alexander Ivashkin and Natalia Pavlutskaya. Patrick has an extensive background in chamber music performance, and was a founding member of the Tankstream Quartet (now Australian String Quartet) whose international career was launched after winning first prize in the Osaka International Chamber Music Competition, Japan 2002. They went on to be prize-winners in the Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition (2003).

Stephen Emmerson studied piano with Pamela Page at University of Queensland and later in London with Peter Wallfisch of the Royal College of Music. At the completion of his undergraduate degree, a Commonwealth Scholarship enabled him to study at New College Oxford where he graduated with a Master of Philosophy and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. He has been on full-time staff at the Queensland Conservatorium since 1987 where he teaches various music history and performance-related courses. As a pianist, he has performed widely around Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the Pacific. In addition to solo performances on piano and fortepiano, the focus of his performance career in recent years has been within various chamber ensembles including the Griffith Trio and Dean–Emmerson–Dean, with whom he has toured internationally. Recordings of his playing in collaboration with a variety of performers have been released by ABC Classics, Move Records, The Anthology of Australian Music on Disc, CPO, Tall Poppies, Contact and Melba. His performances and recordings are broadcast regularly on local and national radio.

 

Composer’s Note:

After Nina for clarinet, cello and piano, Opus 73 (2007) – Andrew Schultz

After Nina was composed in the first half of 2007 for the Endeavour Trio (Paul Dean, Trish O’Brien and Stephen Emmerson). It is a ten minute work which was written at the same time as my chamber opera, The Children’s Bach. The work is a slow and lyrical study based around a pattern of low chords heard first in the piano. 

The title and the mood of the piece refer to the Nina Simone version of the song, Strange Fruit with its sparse piano accompaniment. Strange Fruit is the anti-lynching civil rights song written in the 1930s by Abel Meeropol and then made famous by Billie Holiday.

‘Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.’

I have often been asked why it is the Nina Simone version of the song that interested me rather than the more well-known version by Billie Holiday. It is the relatively detached style of Simone’s version – the limited use of overt emotionalism when dealing with a topic that so easily invites it. Whilst Simone does give vent towards the end, her style is mostly sparse and allows the text to stand.

That idea of restraint as embodied in the use of the stalking, low chords was important to me at this time because I was also dealing with unsettling and emotive material in the subject and text of The Children’s Bach. The question in my mind was how to allow the text to be heard and its impact kept in clear focus with the music still suggesting and adding more than the text could provide on its own.

c. Andrew Schultz, 2007

 

Excerpts from Reviews of After Nina:

“Schultz’ captivating After Nina, with its slow, stalking chords, was partly inspired by the brooding tone of Nina Simone’s rendition of Strange Fruit.  A recording of the latter, played to the audience before Schultz’s work, was an ideal way to familiarize listeners with the composer’s music.”
[Gillian Wills, The Australian, 22 August 2009]

“Andrew Schultz’s After Nina is inspired by Nina Simone’s version of Billie Holliday’s Strange Fruit. After Selby read the first stanza of the original poem, ”black bodies swinging in the Southern breeze”, it was hard to hear anything but tragedy in Schultz’s eloquent, spare writing.”

[Harriet Cunningham, Sydney Morning Herald, 5 July 2012]

 

 Details:

Schultz, Andrew. After Nina, Opus 73 (2007). Paul Dean – clarinet, Patrick Murphy – cello, Stephen Emmerson – piano. Sydney: Sedition, 2014. SEDITION7.

Sea Cliff – Horizon – Fortress – Twelve Variations in Brisbane

Fred Williams - Lysterfield (1965)

Fred Williams – Lysterfield (1965)

On Saturday 2nd August 2014 at 7:30pm at St John’s Cathedral, Ann Street, Brisbane, Andrew Schultz’s new work for winds, brass and percussion will be premiered. The St Peter’s Suite is in three movements: Sea Cliff, Horizon and Fortress.  The suite will be presented by the wind orchestra from St Peter’s College Brisbane who commissioned the work and will be conducted by the composer. Read more about the work below. Tickets are $10 Adults and $5 Concession and available at the door.

On Sunday 3rd August 2014 at 3:00pm at the Concert Hall of the Queensland Performing Arts Centre, Brisbane Southbank, duo pianists, Bernard Lanskey and Stephen Emmerson present a concert for the Kawai Piano Series that will include a performance of Twelve Variations by Andrew Schultz.  This is a work they commissioned in 1997 and which they have performed and recorded frequently since in Australia, Europe and Asia.  The program for the concert also includes works by Brahms and Schubert.  More information about the concert and to obtain tickets.

Fred Williams - Acrobats (1956)

Fred Williams – Acrobats (1956)

 

Composer’s note

Andrew Schultz – St Peter’s Suite – for winds, brass and percussion, Opus 97 (2014)

  1. Sea cliff
  2. Horizon
  3. Fortress

The three pieces that make up the St Peter’s Suite were written in the first half of 2014 in response to a commission from St Peter’s Lutheran College in Brisbane, the school where I attended high school in the 1970s. Each of the pieces can be performed on its own or in any combination with one or both of the other pieces. The three pieces are linked by connections to the Australian landscape.

The first piece, Sea Cliff, is a processional style fanfare for brass and one percussionist (playing a tambour or hand-held drum). The mood of the movement is stately, grand and solemn and features solos for the trumpet and horn players. The movement can be performed with the players processing or it can be played in a normal concert layout with the players on-stage.

The second piece, Horizon, is the longest of the three. Horizon presents, in the foreground, lyrical and personal solos for clarinet, flute, alto saxophone and muted trumpet against a distant background of rumbling percussion and slow-moving bass instruments. Finally, the movement erupts into excitement as the steady accumulation of ideas reaches catharsis. The title refers to landscapes of the sort painted by Fred Williams which are ringed by an endless horizon of eye-popping flatness broken only by the occasional miserable half-dead tree.

The third piece is called Fortress and here the sound world is more violent and dramatic with percussive writing of a brutal ilk juxtaposed with brass fanfares, insistent and grotesque bass lines, and wild trills in the upper woodwind parts. The piece proceeds like a joyous parade of the ugly, demented but determined denizens of a cliff-top citadel.