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Barren Grounds digital release

Having been swamped with requests to not discontinue this blog we will relent and keep putting news here as well as on the main website:



Sedition has released a digital version of the Perihelion recording of Andrew Schultz’s Barren Grounds, opus 36 (1988) and it is now available on all digital music store websites including iTunes and online streaming networks including Spotify. The performers who were in Perihelion for this recording were Nigel Sabin, clarinet; Patricia Pollett, viola; Gwyn Roberts, cello; and Colin Spiers, piano. Cover art is by Nicole Saintilan. Catalogue number is Sedition9.


Barren Grounds, opus 36 (1988)

1. . . . this ground
2. The Twittering Machine

South of Sydney, on the Illawarra escarpment overlooking the sea, Barren Grounds is a wilderness reserve and bird breeding area. With a strange and otherworldly landscape – stunted growth and marshy ground – the place feels still, yet the strange, eerie surface conceals a fecund underlife. For me, the place occupies a state of mind; this, rather than any programmatic intention, prompted the title.

Movement 1, is a slow, lyrical and sinewy reworking of a vocal piece, Seafarer, whose final line: “And learn to sleep upon this ground”, with its reference to mortality, suggested the passacaglia form used.

Paul Klee’s ornithological automaton painting, The Twittering Machine, gives Movement 2 its inspiration. The musical intention at times resembles an ungainly machine that keeps running awry and needs to be wound-up again. Spinning out rhythmic fragments and employing mosaic technique are recurrent preoccupations.

Barren Grounds is scored for for clarinet, viola, ‘cello and piano and was the inaugural work commissioned by Perihelion (an ensemble resident at the University of Queensland). Itwas composed with financial assistance from the Performing Arts Board of the Australia Council.

© Andrew Schultz, 1988





The last post


This blog/website for news about Andrew Schultz’s music is saying (well, virtually saying) ‘so long and thanks for all the fish‘ because all of the news functions are now located in the main website: has just had a complete redesign and now has many more functions, useful links and a greatly enlarged content so please check it out. The new website was designed by Marco Gatta at Technique Interactive.

So this blog won’t be updated any further and at some point it will go to the great digital graveyard in the cloud.


PS … And whilst you’re still here, there is a final piece of news: Sydney clarinettist extraordinaire, Jason Noble, has released a new CD of clarinet music including Night Birds for solo clarinet by Andrew Schultz.  The CD is called Chi’s Cakewalk and is available online from iTunes etc and from music stores as a CD; here is a link with more information, details and excerpts.


PPS … Will there be, I hear you ask (well, virtually hear you ask), any record left of anything from this era in history if it’s all destined to be digital ephemera????

Thank goodness we still have landfill for future archaeologists to dig around in.





Schultz and Firth’s Southern Cantata premieres in Melbourne

The moon drowned in the ocean,
A silver coin.
Is water safer than land?

The towering waters fall, the dinghy floods,
We swallow salt, we swallow blood.

A star arises in the morning,
A deep grey sky, and pre-dawn calm.

The wind calls. A child’s voice.
The waves on the wet sand found him
After the storm.

[Katherine Firth, “The Moon Drowned,” Movement 3 from Southern Cantata, 2017.]


Southern Cantata, a new advent cantata commissioned by St Johns Southgate, Melbourne to celebrate their Bach Cantata Program’s 20th birthday will have its premiere on Sunday 3 December 2017, at  9am.

The work is scored for for choir, 2 soloists and period instrument orchestra (strings, trumpet, timpani, theorbo, harpsichord and organ) composed by Andrew Schultz to a libretto by Katherine Firth.

Kate Macfarlane (soprano), Robert Macfarlane (tenor).

St Johns Southgate

20 City Road

Southbank 3006

Telephone (03) 9682 4995

Director of Music: Graham Lieschke

The Cantata performance will be preceded at 8:30am by a discussion of the new work with Katherine, Graham and Andrew.


For more information:

St Johns Southern Cantata Flyer*


Schultz’s Maali premieres with WASO

Andrew Schultz’s Maali was commissioned by Geoff Stearn for the West Australian Symphony Orchestra (WASO). The World Premiere performances will soon be given by the West Australia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Simone Young with soloists Peter Facer (oboe), Allan Meyer (clarinet), Adam Mikulicz (bassoon), and David Evans (horn) at the Perth Concert Hall on 4 and 5 August 2017. The work was composed in Sydney in 2016.

Maali is a large-scale three movement work in the tradition of the sinfonia concertante – works for a small group of concerto soloists with orchestra. In this case the soloists are the wind quartet combination of oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn. Each of the parts is quite challenging and virtuosic and there are also intense ensemble demands on the quartet as a group. The work is accompanied by a large orchestra including full brass and percussion sections – the orchestral scoring does omit oboe, clarinet, bassoon but includes three flutes (which have a prominent role in the work) and also includes cor anglais, bass clarinet and contrabassoon. The latter are the bass siblings of the solo woodwind parts and with the flutes complement the sonorities of the solo instruments.

The three movements are arranged fast-slow-fast with the second movement running without break into the final movement. The first movement is by turns rhythmically playful and expressively lyrical with the interchange of moods suggesting the natural world of great birds at play. The second movement is dream-like as one musical image floats into another, in each case expressively led by a soloist.

The final movement is an extremely buoyant and jubilant set of double variations. There are two themes heard (or one theme with two halves in you prefer) followed by a total of 10 variations (or 5 pairs of variations). The music of the double theme alternates a rhythmic melodic line (first heard in solo horn) with an answering chorale-like passage; this pattern continues through the movement. The great birds referred to in the title, Maali, also provide a clue to the source of the musical ideas in this movement.


Andrew Schultz – Maali, Opus 101 (2016)

Concerto for oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon with orchestra

Movement 1 – Lively, fast and playful

Movement 2 – Slow, dreamlike

Movement 3 – Variations: Fast, joyous

Duration: approximately 28 minutes


ABC Classic FM will broadcast the concert on Saturday 12 August at midday:


For more information on the work and the composer:



Falling Man/Dancing Man, CD Release




Andrew Schultz’s large-scale 2005 composition for organ and orchestra, Falling Man/Dancing Man, will shortly be released on the US label, Navona, as part of a compilation of contemporary orchestral works. The soloist in the work is the exciting Czech organist, Karel Martinek, performing on the grand organ of the Dum Kultury (House of Culture) in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Full details of the CD are below; individual works on the CD are also available via all digital formats.


Falling Man/Dancing Man for solo organ and orchestra,

opus 68 (2005)

Movement 1  Infinity Jinx                          6:00

Movement 2  Deep Crossing                     7:33

Movement 3 The Laughing Man               8:52

Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Petr Vronsky – conductor, Karel Martinek – organ

Recorded at Dum Kultury, Ostrava, Czech Republic on 13 September 2016

Producer: Vit Muzik,  Engineers – Ales Dvorak, Jan Kosulic

CD Title: Winter’s Warmth, Contemporary Works for Orchestra

Label: Navona Records, Catalog: NV6091

Release date: 14 April 2017


YouTube Promotional Video:

SoundCloud Link:

Information about Andrew Schultz:

An interview with the composer about Falling Man/Dancing Man in StressPoints (eNewsletter of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies):



Program note:

Falling Man/Dancing Man is a concerto-style work for solo pipe organ and orchestra composed for first performance on the organ of the Melbourne Town Hall in 2005. The twenty minute work is in three separate but related movements.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was initially inspired by two photos with contrasting depictions of human reactions to war. The first was the abject image of a Falling Man taken from the ground below the World Trade Centre attacks in New York in 2001. The image was later suppressed and remains a deeply contradictory photo given the choices and pain implicit in the subject’s decision to jump. The second shows a Dancing Man who is celebrating in a Sydney street at the end of World War Two. His hat is in the air as he dances for joy at the end of war. The more I looked into it the more I became aware that images and artwork depicting falling and dancing bodies are almost universal icons from rock art to the present. Perhaps this is because they depict fundamental truths about human experience. Whilst echoes of both these and other images have found their way into the piece, the musical matters took their own course in the work and in the end the organist’s dancing feet and physical elevation in the organ loft also seemed apt for the title.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was commissioned by Symphony Australia for the Melbourne Symphony (with organ soloist, Calvin Bowman and conductor, Oleg Caetani) and composed with the assistance of a residency at the Leighton Studios, Banff Centre for the Arts, Canada.



Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016


Schultz premiere performances


SSO/Thatcher perform Endling in Newcastle 2016.

SSO/Thatcher perform Schultz’s Endling in Newcastle 2016.



Premiere performances, 2014-17

WP – World Premiere; AP – Australian Premiere; ASP – Asian Premiere; EP – European Premiere


New work – Cantata (libretto, Katherine Firth). St John’s Camerata and Choir, St John’s Southbank, Melbourne, 3 December 2017. WP.

Maali – Concerto for oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon. West Australian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Simone Young; soloists: Peter Facer (oboe), Allan Meyer (clarinet), Jane Kirchner-Lindner (bassoon), David Evans (horn), Perth Concert Hall, 4 & 5 August 2017. WP.

Sleepers Wake – Karalananga. Bernard Lanskey, World Classical Music Series, Royal Mirage Hotel, Dubai, 16 December 2016. ASP.

Night Flight. Sophie Rowell and Kristian Chong, Melbourne Recital Centre, 2 May 2016. AP.

Nocturnes and Variations. Stephen Emmerson, Conservatory Concert Hall, National University of Singapore, 17 February 2016. ASP.

Gallipoli Symphony (includes August Offensive, large orchestra version). Queensland Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jessica Cottis, Concert Hall, Qld Performing Arts Centre, Brisbane, 24 November 2015. AP

Prelude and Postscript. Antony Gray, Grieg Society of Great Britain – Schott’s Music Shop, London, 13 November 2015. EP.

Nocturnes and Variations. Stephen Emmerson, Ian Hanger Recital Hall, Queensland Conservatorium, Brisbane, 28 October 2015. WP.

Paradise and Prelude and Postscript. Halcyon, Io Myers Theatre, UNSW, Sydney, 17 September 2015. AP.

Endling and Willow Bend. BBC Ulster Orchestra conducted by David Porcelijn, Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 12-14 August 2015. EP.

Gallipoli Symphony (includes August Offensive, large orchestra version). Istanbul State Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jessica Cottis, Hagia Irene Monumental Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, 4 August 2015. WP.

Le Molière Imaginaire. I Fagiolini, Sydney Recital Hall (also Newcastle, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra, Perth), Musica Viva International Concert Series, 25 July – 8 August 2015. WP.

Sound Lur and Serpent. Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vasily Petrenko, Concert Hall, Sydney Opera House, 22-24 July 2015. AP.

Paradise. Felicitas Fuchs, Li-Wei Qin, Bernard Lanskey, La Longtaine, Montigny sur Loing, France, 8 June 2015. WP.

August Offensive. Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Garry Walker, Federation Concert Hall, Hobart, 27 March 2015. AP.

St Peter’s Suite. St Peter’s Symphonic Winds conducted by Andrew Schultz, St John’s Cathedral, Brisbane, 2 August 2014. WP.

Sound Lur and Serpent. Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Robertson, Shanghai Oriental Arts Centre, China (also Jinan, Beijing, Xi’an, Hangzhou, Shenzhen, Guangzhou), 24 June–5 July 2014. WP.


For more information on these performances, the website, has been updated and includes recent catalogue additions, press reviews and recording releases.

Six compositions shortlisted for major Australian awards

Reprinted from Limelight Magazine, November 14, 2016
James Ledger, Milliken, Skipworth, Dean, Ford and Schultz are in the running for Paul Lowin Prizes.

It’s been three years since the prestigious Paul Lowin Prizes were last awarded, but today six recent Australian compositions have been announced as finalists for awards in 2016. The Orchestral Prize, worth $25,000, and the Song Cycle Prize, worth $15,000, are among Australia’s richest rewards for music composition and are managed every two or three years by Perpetual in collaboration with the Australian Music Centre.

The three works shortlisted for this year’s Orchestral Prize are James Ledger’s 2013 Violin Concert Golden Years, written for Margaret Blades and commissioned by the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, Cathy Milliken’s Earth Plays, premiered last year by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and winner of this year’s Art Music Awards Orchestral Work of the Year, and Lachlan Skipworth’s Clarinet Concerto, which won the Australian Art Music Awards’ 2015 prize for Best Performance of an Australian Composition for Ashley Smith and WASO.

Shortlisted for the Song Cycle Prize are Brett Dean’s Hamlet-inspired String Quartet No 2 for soprano and string quartet And once I played Ophelia (now recorded on the Chandos label), Andrew Ford’s 2013 song cycle Last Words for soprano, violin, cello and piano – a setting of final remarks from Goethe and Alban Berg to Cloudstreet’s Fish Lamb – and Andrew Schultz’s Paradise, a setting of five songs for soprano, cello and piano written in 2013.

Paul Lowin, who died in Vienna in 1961, was born in 1893 in Czechoslovakia, lived in Austria in the 1930s, and fled the Nazi terror to come to Australia in 1939. In his hand-written will he stated his wish to establish a competition for works by living Australian composers, but left rather subjective instructions that the entries would be expected to be in a “modern but not too modern” style. It took executors an agonising 30 years to thrash out what that awkward qualification actually meant and how it might be applied in practice, before the first awards took place in 1991.

According to the judges, a record number of entries were received this time around, with 67 orchestral submissions and 59 song cycles. As has always been the case, nominations were accepted from the general public as well as from a range of music professionals. Previous Paul Lowin Prize winners have included Nigel Westlake, Elliott Gyger, Mary Finsterer, Andrew Schultz, Brett Dean, Rosalind Page, Nigel Butterley, Julian Yu, Georges Lentz, Brenton Broadstock, Martin Wesley-Smith, Michael Smetanin, Raffæle Marcellino, Liza Lim and Andrew Ford.

The recipients of the two Paul Lowin Prizes will be announced at a ceremony in Sydney on December 6. Other shortlisted works will receive a special commendation and the sum of $400.

– See more at:

Le Molière Imaginaire wins Art Music Award

Comedic send-up wins Art Music Award

Republished from UNSW Newsroom, 17 August 2016.  Article by Clare Morgan.


A “witty and naughty” vocal send-up by composer and Head of the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW,  Andrew Schultz has won a 2016 Art Music Award.


Composer and Professor of Music Andrew Schultz.

A hilarious vocal send-up of the medical profession has won Head of the School of the Arts & Media Professor Andrew Schultz a 2016 Art Music Award.

Professor Schultz won the Vocal/Choral Work of the Year for his comical Le Molière Imaginaire, composed for the eight voices of British a cappella ensemble I Fagiolini.

Described as “urbane, virtuosic, cultured, witty and naughty in equal measure”, Le Molière Imaginaire was inspired by the final scene in Molière’s last play, Le Malade Imaginaire (The Imaginary Invalid). It features a musical interlude in which a mock graduation ceremony for a quack doctor becomes increasingly farcical.

Professor Schultz shared the award with writer Timothy Knapman, who adapted the original text.

The comic romp had its world premiere as part of Musica Viva Australia’s 2015 international concert season.

Professor Schultz had a second work nominated in the same category, Paradise, five songs for soprano, cello and piano.

The Art Music Awards, presented by the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) and the Australian Music Centre, are Australia’s night of nights for musicians based in the experimental, jazz and classical genres.

This year’s awards ceremony was held in Melbourne and hosted by Jonathan Biggins.


Watch a video interview with Andrew Schultz about the award


Read more about the awards in Limelight Magazine

Endling and Willow Bend with BBC Ulster Orchestra

The BBC Ulster Orchestra, conducted by David Porcelijn, present Willow Bend and Endling by Andrew Schultz in concerts in Ulster Hall, Belfast on  Wednesday 12 August and Friday 14 August. The concerts are a part of the BBC Radio 3 Summer Invitation Concerts with the theme of ‘Music of the Southern Hemisphere.’ The concerts also include music by Grainger, Sculthorpe, Glanville-Hicks and Kats-Chernin.  Other concerts in the series include music from New Zealand and Brazil. For all details of the concerts, broadcasts and the venue please follow this link:

Excerpts of Endling and Willow Bend can be heard on this BBC website:

For information about Endling and Willow Bend:

Watch a YouTube excerpt of Endling as used in the film, Flight:

Schultz’s August Offensive in Istanbul and Brisbane

Gallipoli Symphony premiere

Commissioned by the Australian Department of Veterans’ Affairs and supported by the Turkish Ministry for Culture and Tourism as part of the 2015 Year of Friendship and during the 100th anniversary year of the Gallipoli Campaign, the World Premiere of Gallipoli Symphony was conducted at the historically-significant Hagia Irene Monumental Museum in Istanbul on Tuesday 4 August 2015. The work contains music by Australian, Turkish and New Zealand composers including Andrew Schultz’s orchestral work, August Offensive.

It was performed to an invitation-only audience by the Istanbul State Symphony Orchestra under the direction of United Kingdom-based Australian conductor, Jessica Cottis.  Specialist soloist musicians Michael Askill (percussion), William Barton (didgeridoo), Horomona Horo (Maori instruments), Julian Jackson (harmonica) and Omar Faruk Tekbilek (Turkish instruments) featured throughout the performance.  A combined choir including representatives from the St Joseph’s Gregory Terrace – All Hallow’s Gallipoli Choir (Australia) and the (Turkish) State Opera and Ballet provided vocal accompaniment in the first and final movements of the Symphony.

Gallipoli Symphony was also performed by the Queensland Symphony Orchestra/Cottis in Brisbane, at the Queensland Performing Arts Centre – Concert Hall, on Tuesday 24 November 2015 at 7:30pm. Details:

The ABC-TV  broadcast of the Istanbul performance was available on i-view until 20 August 2015:

The ABC-TV production of the Istanbul performance is available on DVD:

The ABC Classics recording of the Brisbane performance is available on CD: and via iTunes:


Useful links

Visit the Gallipoli Symphony website for full details of the events and music.

Read more about August Offensive and its premiere at Gallipoli in 2013:

Hear an excerpt of August Offensive and read a brief interview about the piece and the Gallipoli Symphony project:

Get a recording of August Offensive from iTunes:

Read Gordon Williams program note for August Offensive.