Andrew Schultz music news

Blog and news for www.andrewschultz.net

Ekstasis and Wildflower new digital release

 

Sedition have released The Song Company’s exciting recordings of Andrew Schultz’s two works for vocal sextet: Ekstasis, op. 43 (1990) and Wildflower, op. 71 (2006). Both works were written for The Song Company and their Artistic Director at the time, Roland Peelman, who conducts the group in these recordings. The new release means that both works are now available for streaming as well as digital download. The recording is available from 11 January 2019 on all major download and streaming services including iTunes, Spotify, Deezer, Napster, Shazam, Pandora etc etc…

 

 


“Ekstasis…here was originality indeed, with a multitude of anguished, increasingly urgent and complex sounds emerging from a silence that itself added a dimension, finally sinking into calm. This was ecstasy in a sensual, sexual sense, musically transcribed.”

[Sydney Morning Herald]

 

Ekstasis was composed in August 1990 for The Song Company and is a setting for six solo voices of a freely adapted passage from the conclusion of The Song of Songs. The eight lines used are erotic love poetry exploring the sensual territory at the border of love and pain, obsessive lust and spiritual transcendence:

Set me like a seal on your heart,

Like a seal on your arm.

For love is strong as death,

Jealousy relentless as pain.

The flash of it is a flash of fire,

a flame of life itself.

Love no flood can drench

no torrents drown.

Yet whilst the text is direct and passionate it also has a classical and simple shape, as if the strength of meaning demands a balancing formality of expression.

In Ekstasis, the text is used over and over as if all aspects of its meaning are being explored and implying an overtly erotic dramatic shape for the music’s form. In the course of the work, the words are varied slightly but continuously so that the first lines lose their purity and become almost desperate:

Set me like a scar on your soul,

Like a brand on your body.

For love is strong as death,

Time certain as pain.

The music of the piece stems from a few simple sources: a single chord that forms up slowly over a protracted period, sighing glissandi, rapturous moans and calling melodies and a duet refrain that is continuously varied. The work contrasts different possibilities of texture beginning with a solo, then a duet and so on till all six voices are heard. Finally, it closes with a still section – a state of displacement or trance, the literal meanings of the Greek word ekstasis.


“Wildflower … an immensely moving setting.”

[Sydney Morning Herald]

 

Wild flower was commissioned by a Song Company subscriber as a gift for his seriously ill partner on a text he selected for performance by The Song Company. The work was composed in September 2006 and draws its text from the Old Testament prophet, Ezekiel.

 

At birth, the very day you were born,

There was no one to cut your cord,

Or wash you in clean water,

Or rub you with salt,

Or wrap you in cloth.

No one leaned kindly over you to do anything like that for you.

You were left in the open fields;

You were as unloved as that on the day you were born.

I saw you struggling in your blood as I was passing,

And I said to you as you lay in your blood:

Live,

Live in your blood,

And grow like a wild flower,

Grow like the grass of the fields.

 

Adapted from Ezekiel 16: 4-7, The Jerusalem Bible by the composer.


 

Title Ekstasis / Wildflower
Artist The Song Company
UPC 5054526051805
Label SEDITION
Release Date 11 Jan 2019
Phonographic Date 2018
Phonographic Owner SEDITION
No. Tracks 2
Genres Classical & Vocal

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Century CD Release on ABC Classics

Andrew Schultz: Century

Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra | Hamish McKeich conductor

ABC Classics and the TSO announce the latest in their acclaimed Australian Composer Series.

The latest release in the Australian Composer Series features orchestral works by Andrew Schultz: his Symphony No. 3 Century, as well as the works Peace and August Offensive.

Century was commissioned for the celebrations surrounding the centenary of Australia’s national capital, Canberra, in March 2013, and premiered in front of an audience of 150,000 people. Chris Wallace of the Canberra Times wrote, “Century is excellent. It is epic. It is powerful and beautiful.” The work speaks to the fascinating history of our purpose built ‘bush capital’, and the struggle between idealism and practicality that was inherent in its construction. It sounds instantly Australian, celebrating the abundance of our natural environment while also warning of its intensity and brutality.

Peace was written in 2013 for the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, and takes its name from one of JMW Turner’s best-known paintings, Peace – Burial at Sea(1842). This is not a peace of tranquillity, however – rather the uneasy peace that forms after a period of violence and conflict. August Offensive, by contrast, is a very fast, virtuosic and violent work which was premiered at the ANZAC Day dawn service at Gallipoli on 25 April 2013. Commissioned for the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign by the Australian Department of Veterans’ Affairs, it commemorates the horrendous battles in August 1915 which saw some of the most deadly fighting of the entire campaign.

Born in Adelaide in 1960, Andrew Schultz grew up in regional New South Wales and Victoria before his family moved to Brisbane, where he completed his secondary schooling. His teachers and mentors included Colin Brumby, George Crumb, David Lumsdaine and Luciano Berio and he studied at the Universities of Queensland, Pennsylvania and King’s College London. Currently Professor of Music at UNSW in Sydney, his music has been performed, recorded and broadcast widely by many leading groups and orchestras.

Available 16 November 2018 | Digital album | ABC0028948177516

 

TRACKLISTING

ANDREW SCHULTZ born 1960

Symphony No. 3 ‘Century’, Op. 91

1     I. Struggle

2     II. Dream

3     III. Create

4     Peace, Op. 93

5     August Offensive, Op. 92

 

Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

Hamish McKeich conductor

 

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra’s Australian Composer series
is one of the most important recording projects in the history of Australian music,
making available the orchestral works of a wide range of Australian composers,
performed by one of the world’s finest small orchestras.
 

Available 16 November 2018 | Digital album | ABC0028948177516

 

 

LINK TO OBTAIN OR LISTEN TO THE NEW CD:

https://abcmusic.lnk.to/SchultzCentury

 

 

‘Thunderous and frightening’ Harmonia Belli by Andrew Schultz in Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra

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The Diggers’ Requiem Brass – Melbourne

  • St Paul’s Cathedral, 209 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, VIC, 3000 Australia (map)
  • FREE CONCERT

 


The Diggers’ Requiem Brass – Sydney

  • Pitt St Uniting Church, 264 Pitt Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000 Australia(map)
  • FREE CONCERT

JOINTLY COMMISSIONED BY THE AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL AND THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS.

FREE PREVIEW

Diggers Requiem Brass brings you the spirit of the upcoming Diggers Requiem in a FREE concert not to be missed, commemorating the end of WWI.

Diggers-Requiem_DL_2018_FA_lr_cover.jpg

The Diggers’ Requiem represents – in 12 movements – the battles of Fromelles, Pozières, Bapaume, Bullecourt, Villers-Bretonneux, Hamel, Amiens, Péronne and Mont Saint-Quentin, Bellenglise, Montbrehain, Ypres and Passchendaele in Belgium. It refers to death of the Red Baron and the charge of Beersheba in Palestine, which was the last great charge of cavalry. 62,000 bells representing each Australian who died are incorporated into the last movement, Lux Aeterna.

The different movements were written by some of the greatest Australian contemporary composers, as well as the recently discovered Frederick Septimus Kelly, who died at Beaumon-Hamel in 1916. His Lament of the Somme, which evokes the Battle of Pozières, near Albert, was written just two weeks before his death. Elena Kats-Chernin, who finished writing her piece last year, will evoke the battle of Bullecourt in the Pas-de-Calais. Alex Lithgow who wrote the stirring Victoria March, which was played by the Australian Army as it marched into Bapaume in 1917, has his work incorporated into Nigel Westlake’s the Glass Soldier, a piece for trumpet and orchestra. A lone piper plays a lament by Pipe-Major John Grant in the last movement..

This extraordinary symphonic work was devised and curated by Christopher Latham, Artistic Director of the Flowers of War project, and the first musical artist-in-residence at the Australian War Memorial.

PREVIEW PROGRAM

  • GF Handel Dead March from Saul
  • FS Kelly The Somme Lament
  • Nigel Westlake / Alex Lithgow The Liberation of Bapaume
  • Elena Kats-Chernin LacrimosA
  • Richard Mills The Charge at Beersheba
  • Elena Kats-Chernin The Silent Field  
  • Nigel Westlake I Was Blinded, But Now I See
  • Andrew Schultz Harmonia Belli
  • Graeme Koehne  Pie Jesu
  • John Grant Lament for the Pipers Who Fell in the Great War
  • Ross Edwards Lux Aeterna – In Paradisum
  • Christopher Latham Prayer for Peace – Pie Jesu II

PERFORMERS

Paul Goodchild trumpet (AUS), David Novak accordion (Slovenia), Simone Riksman soprano (Holland), Christina Wilson mezzo (AUS), Andrew Goodwintenor (AUS), David Hidden baritone, Jason Craig bagpipes (AUS). Directed by Christopher Latham.

TICKETS – Free concert

 


The Diggers’ Requiem – Canberra

  • Choir and Orchestra – Australian Premiere

 

 


PS.

You can listen to the recording made in Canberra at this URL:

http://www.abc.net.au/classic/evenings/the-diggers-requiem/10317420


PPS.

Read a review:

“Within the 90-minute structure, performed continuously without intermission, there were some memorable highlights. Simone Ricksman’s glorious singing of Graeme Koehne’s Pie Jesu moved many to tears. In his Sanctus movement depicting the demise of the Red Baron, Nigel Westlake had the genesis of a cello concerto, which was handsomely delivered by Simon Cobcroft, principal of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra. Andrew Schultz’s homage to General Monash and the AIF, Harmonia Belli, was a thunderous and frightening evocation of the actual percussion of battle, on the ground and in the air.”

https://www.limelightmagazine.com.au/reviews/the-diggers-requiem-the-flowers-of-war/

Ghosts of Reason on new CD

Andrew Schultz’s Ghosts of Reason – Symphony No 2, op 76 (2008) has just been pre-released on a compact disc and in digital on-line format. The Naxos-distributed Navona CD is called Reason and Reverence  and is performed by the Czech orchestra, the Moravian Philharmonic, conducted by Petr Vronsky.  More details of the recording at this link.
Links for purchase or listening online:

A recent review of Ghosts of Reason from Denmark:

“The symphony starts with the delicate sounds of a harp like the gentle swaying of grass in the breeze. The breeze intensifies and so do the tones of the harp to a degree that is almost surprising. The brass instruments have joined in although only the harp seems to be noticed. More and more instruments join in and divinely beautiful harmonies fill the room. There is somehow something unknown about it. The violins are not playing the melody. It is the usually accompanying instruments changing roles and taking over the lead. The tempo increases, but suddenly a strange kind of calm descends over the audience. How can it be that the violins continue playing? And yet, all light tones seem to have suddenly disappeared. The double bass has taken control of the orchestra! “I would like to be able to convey the scorched, rich ochre sonority found in the voices of Aborigines”, says Andrew Schultz about his work. He has definitely succeeded in doing so. We, the audience, are spell-bound by this music that takes us on a tour through the desert with whispering wind, through rich and fertile areas with birds flapping their wings, to the coast and the roar of the ocean.

Andrew Schultz’ music is filled with emotions and unexpected sounds. The overwhelming warmth of the music becomes even more striking when you have experienced the intellectual character of the composer. These are sounds that open up for his true self, showing his inner self, so warm and sympathetic. Andrew Schultz’ music touches the soul and speaks to the mind.” [Michael Schäfer, Klassisk Pt 66]


 Naxos information page to purchase the CD

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REASON & REVERENCE


PRE-ORDER + ADD TO WISH LIST + $13.49 ($14.99)

Shipping time: Will not ship until 6/8/2018


Reason and Reverance represents an aural exploration of our world’s complexities. By comparing and contrasting present triumphs with past regrets, the composers on this album develop a compelling, philosophical reflection of the world we live in. Conducted by Petr Vronský, the Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra delivers a master class in cohesiveness while tackling a wildly diverse, yet wholly complete set of compositions. The album starts strong with Christopher Keyes’ An Inescapable Entanglement. Keyes binds minimalist elements with late 16th and early 17th century forms of concerto to create a controlled chaos of instruments and voices playing distinct parts simultaneously. In his intent to create an antiphonal sound, Keyes employs eight loudspeakers to project the music achieving a thickened, full texture. Red Rock is a symphonic poem commissioned by the Henderson Symphony and its music director, Taras Krysa. The music is based on the interaction of two musical materials, the first, calm and diatonic, presented by the French horns after the introduction and elaborated by the trumpets and the woodwinds; and the second, more angular and chromatic, also introduced by a solo French horn in the second section. Similar to a sonata form, these materials go through transformations and developments in the middle section, and return evolved and reconciled at the end of the movement. The piece suggests a gliding trip over the stunning landscape of the Red Rock canyon, with its sharp geological contrasts, its ever changing shapes, and its surprising colors. Fernidnando De Sena’s Deciphered Reverence explores the idea of divine presence and creates an interpretation through the consistent, triumphant swelling of the orchestra. De Sena’s piece captures the many moods, modes, and colors in the music to translate his vision of life and celebrate its ambiguity and omnipresence. Composed by Willem Van Twillert, multiple styles set the foundation for Branches of Singularity. Multiple developments transitions from one style to another create an enticing and evolving piece. Andrew Schultz’ Symphony No. 2 – Ghosts of Reason ties the whole album together. Slowing the pace of the otherwise energetic album, Schultz’s composition paints a haunting atmosphere by drawing out the wistful bleakness of its wandering melodies.

 

FACTS
Item number NV6166
Barcode 896931004664
Release date 6/8/2018
Category Orchestral
Label NAVONA
Media type COMPACT DISC
Number of units 1

CD release – Chamber Songs of Andrew Schultz

HALCYON ANNOUNCEMENT

 

 

CD release – Chamber Songs of Andrew Schultz

Halcyon’s new CD This Moment Must Be Sung will be released by Tall Poppies on May 1. The CD showcases recent vocal works by Andrew Schultz and features three substantial song cycles:

To the Evening Star (winner of the 2009 Paul Lowin Song Cycle prize) for soprano and piano
I am writing in this book for soprano, mezzo-soprano, cello, double bass, percussion, harp and piano
Paradise for soprano, cello and piano (runner-up in the 2016 Lowin prize);

and three shorter works:

Lake Moonrise for mezzo-soprano, bass clarinet, cello and percussion (from our Kingfisher project)
I am Black for soprano and piano
Dark Chair for soprano, mezzo-soprano, clarinet, double bass and percussion

You can read program notes for the pieces here and reviews of some of the works here

Andrew’s music has featured in many Halcyon programs over the years and we have great memories of developing I am writing in this book at the Musician’s Cottage during a Bundanon residency with him in 2011 as he got to know our us and our voices even better in that beautiful natural surrounding amidst the wombats, birds and occasional cattle.

Special pre-release offer
Purchase the CD by direct deposit from Tall Poppies before the 1 May and you’ll pay only $23 for the CD (postage included).  Just send your name, postal address and banking receipt to tpoffice@iinet.net.au.

Direct payment details
TALL POPPIES
BSB 062734
a/c: 2812 1448

 

Barren Grounds digital release

Having been swamped with requests to not discontinue this blog we will relent and keep putting news here as well as on the main website: www.andrewschultz.net

 

 

Sedition has released a digital version of the Perihelion recording of Andrew Schultz’s Barren Grounds, opus 36 (1988) and it is now available on all digital music store websites including iTunes and online streaming networks including Spotify. The performers who were in Perihelion for this recording were Nigel Sabin, clarinet; Patricia Pollett, viola; Gwyn Roberts, cello; and Colin Spiers, piano. Cover art is by Nicole Saintilan. Catalogue number is Sedition9.

________________

Barren Grounds, opus 36 (1988)

1. . . . this ground
2. The Twittering Machine

South of Sydney, on the Illawarra escarpment overlooking the sea, Barren Grounds is a wilderness reserve and bird breeding area. With a strange and otherworldly landscape – stunted growth and marshy ground – the place feels still, yet the strange, eerie surface conceals a fecund underlife. For me, the place occupies a state of mind; this, rather than any programmatic intention, prompted the title.

Movement 1, is a slow, lyrical and sinewy reworking of a vocal piece, Seafarer, whose final line: “And learn to sleep upon this ground”, with its reference to mortality, suggested the passacaglia form used.

Paul Klee’s ornithological automaton painting, The Twittering Machine, gives Movement 2 its inspiration. The musical intention at times resembles an ungainly machine that keeps running awry and needs to be wound-up again. Spinning out rhythmic fragments and employing mosaic technique are recurrent preoccupations.

Barren Grounds is scored for for clarinet, viola, ‘cello and piano and was the inaugural work commissioned by Perihelion (an ensemble resident at the University of Queensland). Itwas composed with financial assistance from the Performing Arts Board of the Australia Council.

© Andrew Schultz, 1988

 

 

 

The last post

 

This blog/website for news about Andrew Schultz’s music is saying (well, virtually saying) ‘so long and thanks for all the fish‘ because all of the news functions are now located in the main website: www.andrewschultz.net

www.andrewschultz.net has just had a complete redesign and now has many more functions, useful links and a greatly enlarged content so please check it out. The new website was designed by Marco Gatta at Technique Interactive.

So this blog won’t be updated any further and at some point it will go to the great digital graveyard in the cloud.

 

PS … And whilst you’re still here, there is a final piece of news: Sydney clarinettist extraordinaire, Jason Noble, has released a new CD of clarinet music including Night Birds for solo clarinet by Andrew Schultz.  The CD is called Chi’s Cakewalk and is available online from iTunes etc and from music stores as a CD; here is a link with more information, details and excerpts.

 

PPS … Will there be, I hear you ask (well, virtually hear you ask), any record left of anything from this era in history if it’s all destined to be digital ephemera????

Thank goodness we still have landfill for future archaeologists to dig around in.

 

 

 

 

Schultz and Firth’s Southern Cantata premieres in Melbourne

The moon drowned in the ocean,
A silver coin.
Is water safer than land?

The towering waters fall, the dinghy floods,
We swallow salt, we swallow blood.

A star arises in the morning,
A deep grey sky, and pre-dawn calm.

The wind calls. A child’s voice.
The waves on the wet sand found him
After the storm.

[Katherine Firth, “The Moon Drowned,” Movement 3 from Southern Cantata, 2017.]

 

Southern Cantata, a new advent cantata commissioned by St Johns Southgate, Melbourne to celebrate their Bach Cantata Program’s 20th birthday will have its premiere on Sunday 3 December 2017, at  9am.

The work is scored for for choir, 2 soloists and period instrument orchestra (strings, trumpet, timpani, theorbo, harpsichord and organ) composed by Andrew Schultz to a libretto by Katherine Firth.

Kate Macfarlane (soprano), Robert Macfarlane (tenor).

St Johns Southgate

20 City Road

Southbank 3006

Telephone (03) 9682 4995

http://www.stjohnssouthgate.com.au

Director of Music: Graham Lieschke

The Cantata performance will be preceded at 8:30am by a discussion of the new work with Katherine, Graham and Andrew.

 

For more information:

St Johns Southern Cantata Flyer*

 

Schultz’s Maali premieres with WASO

Andrew Schultz’s Maali was commissioned by Geoff Stearn for the West Australian Symphony Orchestra (WASO). The World Premiere performances will soon be given by the West Australia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Simone Young with soloists Peter Facer (oboe), Allan Meyer (clarinet), Adam Mikulicz (bassoon), and David Evans (horn) at the Perth Concert Hall on 4 and 5 August 2017. The work was composed in Sydney in 2016.

Maali is a large-scale three movement work in the tradition of the sinfonia concertante – works for a small group of concerto soloists with orchestra. In this case the soloists are the wind quartet combination of oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn. Each of the parts is quite challenging and virtuosic and there are also intense ensemble demands on the quartet as a group. The work is accompanied by a large orchestra including full brass and percussion sections – the orchestral scoring does omit oboe, clarinet, bassoon but includes three flutes (which have a prominent role in the work) and also includes cor anglais, bass clarinet and contrabassoon. The latter are the bass siblings of the solo woodwind parts and with the flutes complement the sonorities of the solo instruments.

The three movements are arranged fast-slow-fast with the second movement running without break into the final movement. The first movement is by turns rhythmically playful and expressively lyrical with the interchange of moods suggesting the natural world of great birds at play. The second movement is dream-like as one musical image floats into another, in each case expressively led by a soloist.

The final movement is an extremely buoyant and jubilant set of double variations. There are two themes heard (or one theme with two halves in you prefer) followed by a total of 10 variations (or 5 pairs of variations). The music of the double theme alternates a rhythmic melodic line (first heard in solo horn) with an answering chorale-like passage; this pattern continues through the movement. The great birds referred to in the title, Maali, also provide a clue to the source of the musical ideas in this movement.

 

Andrew Schultz – Maali, Opus 101 (2016)

Concerto for oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon with orchestra

Movement 1 – Lively, fast and playful

Movement 2 – Slow, dreamlike

Movement 3 – Variations: Fast, joyous

Duration: approximately 28 minutes

 

ABC Classic FM will broadcast the concert on Saturday 12 August at midday: http://www.abc.net.au/classic/content/2017/08/12/4715078.htm

 

For more information on the work and the composer: www.andrewschultz.net

 

 

Falling Man/Dancing Man, CD Release

 

cvr

 

Andrew Schultz’s large-scale 2005 composition for organ and orchestra, Falling Man/Dancing Man, will shortly be released on the US label, Navona, as part of a compilation of contemporary orchestral works. The soloist in the work is the exciting Czech organist, Karel Martinek, performing on the grand organ of the Dum Kultury (House of Culture) in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Full details of the CD are below; individual works on the CD are also available via all digital formats.

 

Falling Man/Dancing Man for solo organ and orchestra,

opus 68 (2005)

Movement 1  Infinity Jinx                          6:00

Movement 2  Deep Crossing                     7:33

Movement 3 The Laughing Man               8:52

Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, Petr Vronsky – conductor, Karel Martinek – organ

Recorded at Dum Kultury, Ostrava, Czech Republic on 13 September 2016

Producer: Vit Muzik,  Engineers – Ales Dvorak, Jan Kosulic

CD Title: Winter’s Warmth, Contemporary Works for Orchestra

Label: Navona Records, Catalog: NV6091

Release date: 14 April 2017

Web: www.navonarecords.com/catalog/nv6091

YouTube Promotional Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBOrCkCoPS8

SoundCloud Link: https://soundcloud.com/parmarecordings/winters-warmth

Information about Andrew Schultz: www.andrewschultz.net

An interview with the composer about Falling Man/Dancing Man in StressPoints (eNewsletter of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies): http://www.andrewschultz.net/resources/trauma_classics.pdf

 

 

Program note:

Falling Man/Dancing Man is a concerto-style work for solo pipe organ and orchestra composed for first performance on the organ of the Melbourne Town Hall in 2005. The twenty minute work is in three separate but related movements.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was initially inspired by two photos with contrasting depictions of human reactions to war. The first was the abject image of a Falling Man taken from the ground below the World Trade Centre attacks in New York in 2001. The image was later suppressed and remains a deeply contradictory photo given the choices and pain implicit in the subject’s decision to jump. The second shows a Dancing Man who is celebrating in a Sydney street at the end of World War Two. His hat is in the air as he dances for joy at the end of war. The more I looked into it the more I became aware that images and artwork depicting falling and dancing bodies are almost universal icons from rock art to the present. Perhaps this is because they depict fundamental truths about human experience. Whilst echoes of both these and other images have found their way into the piece, the musical matters took their own course in the work and in the end the organist’s dancing feet and physical elevation in the organ loft also seemed apt for the title.

Falling Man/Dancing Man was commissioned by Symphony Australia for the Melbourne Symphony (with organ soloist, Calvin Bowman and conductor, Oleg Caetani) and composed with the assistance of a residency at the Leighton Studios, Banff Centre for the Arts, Canada.

 

 

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016

Andrew Schultz, left, and Karel Martinek in Ostrava, Czech Republic, September 2016